Driving the Old Big Rigs

http://www.smart-trucking.com/old-big-rigs.html
Dave tells of some of the older model big rigs he drove, in his early years as a truck driver.
Early ’70’s Transtar II
R-Model Mack
1980 Kenworth W900A
1980 Western Star
1983 Freightliner Cabover

Some of the trucks were a pleasure to drive, state of the art at the time, while some of the trucks were quite an adventure to maneuver!
Dave disliked the Freightliner Cabover he was driving so much, he left the job…. too hard on the back, left him roadside nearly daily and very unreliable!
Love to hear your comments on the older trucks you drove!

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19 thoughts on “Driving the Old Big Rigs

  • January 14, 2018 at 10:20 am
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    a-c was requried in that time

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  • January 14, 2018 at 10:54 am
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    Why are cabovers cold?

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  • January 14, 2018 at 11:18 am
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    I started doing this almost as early as you. My first job I drove a 1974 Ford WT 9000 cabover. Not a very good truck. That truck would give you whiplash it was horrible to drive.

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  • January 14, 2018 at 11:42 am
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    Nice video! Thank you. Why did they continue to buy the Macks with the 5×3 transmissions?

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  • January 14, 2018 at 12:06 pm
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    My first paying truck was a 85 Freightshaker with a 300 Cummins and a 9 speed.
    Spring suspension, No Jake and running the lower 48, ya wanna have stained drawers, take something like that down a 9% grade for 9 miles with 78700 gross.
    Snow at the top and Summer below.

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  • January 14, 2018 at 12:34 pm
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    im 39 and i've been driving for 16 years my oldest trucks i've driven were from 78 the year i was born i've driven cab overs and my favorites are the 90s era international cab overs i dont like the feel of the newer trucks i think some of them are too soft and floaty going down the road and the ergonomics inside the cab seem weird i like the instrument and gauge cluster to wrap around me when i'm behind the wheel and everything to be reachable easy my three favorite trucks are international kenworth and volvo mostly in volvo the globetrotters that you cannot get in north america i had one in the middle east and love it when i was contracting over there it was fast and had great pickup

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  • January 14, 2018 at 1:27 pm
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    So far the oldest rig I've driven is a 1994 Kenworth T600 "Anteater" with a big cam Cummins and an Eaton Super 10. It had 1.3 million miles, and boy did it show!

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  • January 14, 2018 at 1:52 pm
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    The guy that taught me in 64 was 74 years old at the time and the way he told it we were well off with the fleet of old R model International Harvesters with an inline 6 gas engine and a five speed with a two speed differential. I was surprised at how much they could pull when one day I pulled a pole trailer stretched out to 90 feet with 98,000 pounds of structural steel on it. Good thing I only had to go a few miles with that load. In the late 60s I worked for a different company hauling steel with an Autocar that had a 250 Cummins and two four speeds, thirteen speed the hard way. The last truck I drove was a blue Pete with a 350 Cat and a 13 speed.

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  • January 14, 2018 at 2:16 pm
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    Can you still use these trucks for work? If I ever become a trucker I want a older truck. Well I would one

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  • January 14, 2018 at 3:15 pm
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    Nice to start up. I have started 10600 kg two axle nose Bedford, truck was older than me. No pover steering, 8,5 turns side to side on wheel, 4 gears no more synchrony left and two speed rear axle. There was written to dash that lover speed was pover gear and higher speed gear, with all that 106 hp I was not finding out there speed or pover. parking brake mechanic, driving brakes normal fluid with vacuum servo. On that 10600 kg total weight could take 7 m3 gravel, it was little over, but every time gone with that too, sometimes slover and many times even more slow. Clutch must adjust every day, because it was loosing adjust, could not lock it and when was old had adjust so many times, that was done self. Air was often in fuel and must make screws open and un air it, bad primary pump was making that air. It was not warm, not cold, was not reliable, only adjustment on seat was that you have seat or not. Some earlier driver had welded 5 cm high box under right foot so could have foot little better position to gas. Way to drive with that was not long, about 2 to 4 km one way. Was good school to young guy.

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  • January 14, 2018 at 3:52 pm
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    not any worse than a 74 auto car. that old detroit took it anywhere

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  • January 14, 2018 at 4:37 pm
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    I miss old trucks since they were loud sexy and one of a kind

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  • January 14, 2018 at 5:06 pm
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    Put today's "supertruckers" in one of these old trucks– say a cabover with twin sticks and Cummins and they wouldn't know whether to shit or go blind…

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  • January 14, 2018 at 5:06 pm
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    started in transtar 2. 13 speed,350 cumapart,pulling bullwagon.19years old.this brought back good memories.

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  • January 14, 2018 at 5:36 pm
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    My first truck was a 1968 Ford 800, 391 gasser with 5×3 trannys. Graduated to a 1970 Ford 900 391 gasser with 5×4 trannys. After that I never looked back. I still prefer 5×4's but you can't get them anymore.:(
    On the Freightliner COE mine had a 20,000 lb steer axle with super singles on it. hendrickson spring ride suspension and 46,000 lb axles. Do you want to talk about rough?

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  • January 14, 2018 at 5:59 pm
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    My grandfather drove a 70'S U model mack (1977 I think) when he was youger in his thirties and hauled steel beams then he bought it when the company went out of business and now hes 64 and still drives it and hauls carnival rides. Hes been driving the same u modle mack all them years

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  • January 14, 2018 at 6:48 pm
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    u done had an A model your company was ignorant for getting rid of it for a fuckin western star

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  • January 14, 2018 at 7:39 pm
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    I was talking with a retired trucker (I live in Europe) – and here cabovers have been the standard in trucking pretty much. So he was telling me about stories that when he had to climb a steep hill with a heavy load, based on the sound of the engine he was somehow leaning towards the door, so that if a piston blew out, he would not get killed. Usually the engines were 6 cyls straight, and the engine was not mounted straight up, but oriented with the cylinders towards the driver somewhat. He had heard stories of pistons blowing through the cabin, so he was taking this precaution.

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  • January 14, 2018 at 8:07 pm
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    Personally I don't think you can get any better than a Kenworth W900A with some nice air ride suspension, I don't like new trucks, they're not as well built as the old trucks.

    Reply

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